COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Surfactant protein-D predicts survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

N P Barlo, C H M van Moorsel, H J T Ruven, P Zanen, J M M van den Bosch, J C Grutters
Sarcoidosis, Vasculitis, and Diffuse Lung Diseases: Official Journal of WASOG 2009, 26 (2): 155-61
20560296

BACKGROUND: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive interstitial lung disease with a high mortality rate. As lung transplantation is the only therapeutic option, it is important to predict survival.

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the clinical value of surfactant protein-D as a marker of prognosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

DESIGN: Surfactant protein-D was measured in serum of 72 patients and 305 healthy controls. The optimal cut-off level to define unfavourable prognosis was determined using a ROC analysis. A Cox's proportional Hazards model was used to evaluate variables that were significant predictors of survival.

RESULTS: Serum levels of surfactant protein-D were significantly higher in patients than in controls. ROC analysis showed 460 ng/ml to be the optimal cut-off level to discriminate survivor from non-survivors after 1 year. Patients with high levels (> 460 ng/ml) had a median survival time of 13 months, compared to 67 months in the group with low levels (< 460 ng/ml). Surfactant protein-D showed to be a significant predictor of prognosis, even when corrected for age, sex, smoking, and lung function.

CONCLUSION: The measurement of surfactant protein-D in serum of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis might be a clinically relevant tool to predict survival.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
20560296
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"