JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Safety and efficacy of laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy for complex rectocele.

Colorectal Disease 2011 September
AIM: Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy, previously described for external rectal prolapse, was evaluated for symptomatic complex rectocoele.

METHOD: From January 2004 to December 2008, 84 (50.9%) patients (mean age 64 ± 5 years) underwent laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy for symptomatic complex rectocoele, confirmed preoperatively on dynamic defaecography, with 26 (31%) patients having a concurrent cystocoele. The operative technique was standardized, and those with cystocoele underwent bladder mesh suspension during the same procedure. Prospectively collected data were analysed for preoperative symptoms, operative and functional results [constipation, faecal incontinence (FI), dyspareunia and satisfaction score].

RESULTS: The conversion rate was 3.6% and perioperative morbidity 4.8% with no mortality. At a median follow up of 29 (4-59) months, there was a significant decrease in vaginal discomfort (86-20%) and obstructed defaecation symptoms (83-46%), P < 0.001. There was no significant change in FI (20-16%), no worsening of preoperative symptoms or new complaints of constipation, dyspareunia or FI. Overall, 88% of patients reported an improvement in overall well-being.

CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy is a safe and effective method for treating symptomatic complex rectocoele.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app