Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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The serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinases SGK1-3 stimulate the neutral amino acid transporter SLC6A19.

The neutral amino acid transporter SLC6A19 (B(0)AT1) plays a decisive role in transport of neutral amino acids in the kidney and intestine. Recently, mutations in SLC6A19 were identified that result in severe neutral aminoaciduria known as Hartnup disorder. SLC6A19 expression and function is controlled by the brush-border angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Beyond that the mechanisms regulating SLC6A19 function are unknown. The SLC6A19 sequence contains a conserved putative phosphorylation site for the serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase isoforms SGK1-3, kinases known to regulate a variety of channels and transporters. The present study explored the role of SGK1-3 in the regulation of SLC6A19. As shown by two-electrode voltage clamp in the Xenopus oocyte expression system, leucine-induced currents in SLC6A19 expressing oocytes were activated by the protein kinases SGK1-3. The putative phosphorylation site on the transporter is not essential for SLC6A19 regulation by the kinases. As determined by quantitative immunoassay and electrophysiology, the kinases increase SLC6A19 currents by increasing the cell surface expression of the protein without altering the affinity of the carrier. Following inhibition of carrier insertion into the cell membrane by treatment with brefeldin A (BFA), the leucine-induced current declined significantly slower in Xenopus oocytes expressing SLC6A19 together with SGK1 than in oocytes expressing SLC6A19 alone, a finding pointing to SGK-mediated transporter stabilization in the plasma membrane. Coexpression of ACE2 markedly increased leucine-induced currents in SLC6A19 expressing oocytes that were further enhanced by SGK1-3 kinases. In conclusion, SGK isoforms are novel potent stimulators of SLC6A19 and may thus participate in the regulation of neutral amino acid transport in vivo.

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