COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

BODE-Index vs HADO-score in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Which one to use in general practice?

Cristóbal Esteban, José M Quintana, Javier Moraza, Myriam Aburto, Urko Aguirre, José I Aguirregomoscorta, Susana Aizpiri, Luis V Basualdo, Alberto Capelastegui
BMC Medicine 2010, 8: 28
20497527

BACKGROUND: Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is used to diagnose and establish a prognosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using multi-dimensional scores improves this predictive capacity.Two instruments, the BODE-index (Body mass index, Obstruction, Dyspnea, Exercise capacity) and the HADO-score (Health, Activity, Dyspnea, Obstruction), were compared in the prediction of mortality among COPD patients.

METHODS: This is a prospective longitudinal study. During one year (2003 to 2004), 543 consecutively COPD patients were recruited in five outpatient clinics and followed for three years. The endpoints were all-causes and respiratory mortality.

RESULTS: In the multivariate analysis of patients with FEV1 < 50%, no significant differences were observed in all-cause or respiratory mortality across HADO categories, while significant differences were observed between patients with a lower BODE (less severe disease) and those with a higher BODE (greater severity). Among patients with FEV1 > or = 50%, statistically significant differences were observed across HADO categories for all-cause and respiratory mortality, while differences were observed across BODE categories only in all-cause mortality.

CONCLUSIONS: HADO-score and BODE-index were good predictors of all-cause and respiratory mortality in the entire cohort. In patients with severe COPD (FEV1 < 50%) the BODE index was a better predictor of mortality whereas in patients with mild or moderate COPD (FEV1 > or = 50%), the HADO-score was as good a predictor of respiratory mortality as the BODE-index. These differences suggest that the HADO-score and BODE-index could be used for different patient populations and at different healthcare levels, but can be used complementarily.

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