COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Disparate geographic prevalences of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema among adolescents in five Canadian cities

Hong-Yu Wang, Marcia M M Pizzichini, Allan B Becker, Joanne M Duncan, Alexander C Ferguson, Justina M Greene, Donna C Rennie, Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan, Brett W Taylor, Malcolm R Sears
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 2010, 21 (5): 867-77
20492543
To assess concordance of prevalence rates of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema symptoms among adolescents in five Canadian cities. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase 3 written questionnaires were answered by 8334 adolescents aged 13 to 14 in Vancouver, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Hamilton and Halifax, Canada. Prevalence rates of current symptoms ranged from 13.7-33.0% for wheezing, 14.6-22.6% for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and 8.2-10.4% for atopic eczema. Using Hamilton as reference, the prevalence of wheezing was significantly higher in Halifax (OR = 1.58; 95% CI 1.36-1.84) and Saskatoon (1.27; 1.07-1.50) and significantly lower in Vancouver (0.51; 0.44-0.59). In contrast, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was significantly more prevalent in Winnipeg (1.39; 1.16-1.68) and Halifax (1.36; 1.14-1.61) and trended lower in Saskatoon (0.81; 0.66-1.00). Atopic eczema was significantly more prevalent in Winnipeg (1.31; 1.01-1.69) and Vancouver (1.28; 1.04-1.58). Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed the region of residence, being born in Canada, recent use of acetaminophen and heavy exposure to traffic exhaust were significantly associated with all three allergic conditions, while obesity and having two or more smokers at home was only associated with increased risk for wheezing. Chinese ethnicity decreased that risk. Among five Canadian centres, the highest prevalence rates of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic eczema were not observed in the same regions as the highest prevalence rates of wheezing. This disparity in regional variations in the prevalence rates suggests dissimilar risk factors for the development or expression of wheezing (asthma), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema.

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