JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Incidence and clinical characteristics of childhood glaucoma: a population-based study.

OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence and clinical characteristics of childhood glaucoma in a defined population of the United States.

METHODS: The medical records of all pediatric patients younger than 20 years living in Olmstead County, Minnesota, from January 1, 1965, through December 31, 2004, who met diagnostic criteria for glaucoma or glaucoma suspect were reviewed.

RESULTS: Thirty children were diagnosed as having glaucoma during the 40-year study period. The incidence of childhood glaucoma was 2.29 (95% confidence interval, 1.47-3.12) per 100,000 residents younger than 20 years, with the following types and incidences: 19 acquired (1.46/100,000; 0.80-2.12), 6 secondary (0.45/100,000; 0.08-0.82), and 5 primary glaucoma (0.38/100,000; 0.05-0.72). The birth prevalence of primary congenital glaucoma during the 40-year period was 1 per 68 254 residents younger than 20 years or 1.46 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval, 0.03-8.16). Twenty-four individuals with glaucoma suspect were also identified, yielding an incidence of 1.9 per 100,000 residents younger than 20 years (95% confidence interval, 1.14-2.66).

CONCLUSION: The incidence of childhood glaucoma in this population was 2.29 per 100,000 residents younger than 20 years or 1 per 43 575 residents younger than 20 years. Acquired and secondary forms of glaucoma were the most common, whereas congenital and juvenile glaucoma were rare.

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