Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Randomized clinical trial of quick-release bromocriptine among patients with type 2 diabetes on overall safety and cardiovascular outcomes.

Diabetes Care 2010 July
OBJECTIVE: Quick-release bromocriptine (bromocriptine-QR), a D2 dopamine receptor agonist, is indicated as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. The Cycloset Safety Trial, a 52-week, randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, evaluated the overall safety and cardiovascular safety of this novel therapy for type 2 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 3,095 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized 2:1 to bromocriptine-QR or placebo in conjunction with the patient's usual diabetes therapy (diet controlled only or up to two antidiabetes medications, including insulin). The all-cause-safety end point was the occurrence of any serious adverse event (SAE), with a hazard ratio (HR) noninferiority margin of 1.5. In a prespecified analysis, the frequency of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events defined as a composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, and hospitalization for angina or congestive heart failure was evaluated using modified intent-to-treat analysis (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00377676).

RESULTS: In the bromocriptine-QR group, 176 (8.6%) people reported SAEs compared with 98 (9.6%) in the placebo group (HR 1.02 [96% one-sided CI 1.27]). Fewer people reported a CVD end point in the bromocriptine-QR group versus the placebo group (37 [1.8%] vs. 32 [3.2%], respecively) (HR 0.60 [95% two-sided CI 0.35-0.96]). Nausea was the most commonly reported adverse event in the bromocriptine-QR group.

CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of SAEs was comparable between the treatment arms. Compared with patients in the placebo arm, fewer patients taking bromocriptine-QR experienced a cardiovascular end point.

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