JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

J wave syndromes

Charles Antzelevitch, Gan-Xin Yan
Heart Rhythm: the Official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society 2010, 7 (4): 549-58
20153265
The J wave, also referred to as an Osborn wave, is a deflection immediately following the QRS complex of the surface ECG. When partially buried in the R wave, the J wave appears as J-point elevation or ST-segment elevation. Several lines of evidence have suggested that arrhythmias associated with an early repolarization pattern in the inferior or mid to lateral precordial leads, Brugada syndrome, or arrhythmias associated with hypothermia and the acute phase of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction are mechanistically linked to abnormalities in the manifestation of the transient outward current (I(to))-mediated J wave. Although Brugada syndrome and early repolarization syndrome differ with respect to the magnitude and lead location of abnormal J-wave manifestation, they can be considered to represent a continuous spectrum of phenotypic expression that we propose be termed J-wave syndromes. This review summarizes our current state of knowledge concerning J-wave syndromes, bridging basic and clinical aspects. We propose to divide early repolarization syndrome into three subtypes: type 1, which displays an early repolarization pattern predominantly in the lateral precordial leads, is prevalent among healthy male athletes and is rarely seen in ventricular fibrillation survivors; type 2, which displays an early repolarization pattern predominantly in the inferior or inferolateral leads, is associated with a higher level of risk; and type 3, which displays an early repolarization pattern globally in the inferior, lateral, and right precordial leads, is associated with the highest level of risk for development of malignant arrhythmias and is often associated with ventricular fibrillation storms.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
20153265
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"