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A population-based study of demographical variables and ability to perform activities of daily living in adults with osteogenesis imperfecta.

PURPOSES: To describe demographical variables, and to study functional ability to perform activities of daily life in adults with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI).

METHODS: Population-based study. Ninety-seven patients aged 25 years and older, 41 men and 56 women, were included. For the demographical variables, comparison was made to a matched control-group (475 persons) from the Norwegian general population. Structured interviews concerning social conditions, employment and educational issues and clinical examination were performed. The Sunnaas Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Index was used to assess the ability to perform ADL.

RESULTS: The prevalence of clinical manifestations according to Sillence was in accordance with other studies. Demographical variables showed that most adults with OI are married and have children. They had a higher educational level than the control group, but the employment rate was significantly lower. However, the rate of employed men was similar in both groups. Adult persons with OI achieved a high score when tested for ADL.

CONCLUSIONS: Adults with OI are well educated compared with the general population, and most of them are employed. High scores when tested for ADL indicate that most of them are able to live their lives independently, even though there are some differences according to the severity of the disorder.

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