Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Liquid nitrogen cryotherapy for conjunctival lymphangiectasia: a case series.

PURPOSE: To report a case series of conjunctival lymphangiectasia treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy.

METHODS: A 1.5-mm Brymill cryoprobe was applied in a double freeze-thaw method after an incisional biopsy of a portion of the conjunctiva in patients with conjunctival lymphangiectasia. Freeze times were 1 to 2 seconds with thawing of 5 to 10 seconds between treatments. Patients were reexamined at 1 day, 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and yearly following cryotherapy.

RESULTS: Five eyes of 4 patients (3 male and 1 female) with biopsy-proven conjunctival lymphangiectasia underwent liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. The average patient age was 53 years. Ocular examination revealed large lymphatic vessels that were translucent and without conjunctival injection. Subjective symptoms included epiphora, ocular irritation, eye redness, and occasional blurred vision. After treatment with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy, the patients' symptoms and signs resolved within 2 weeks. Lymphangiectasia recurred twice in one patient, at 1 and 3 years postoperatively. In another patient, lymphangiectasia recurred at 6 months. The average time to recurrence in these 3 eyes was 18 months. Average length of follow-up was 24.5 months for all subjects.

CONCLUSION: Liquid nitrogen cryotherapy may be an effective surgical alternative in the treatment of conjunctival lymphangiectasia. Cryotherapy may need to be repeated in some instances.

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