JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Safety of subcutaneous octreotide in patients with sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia and congestive heart failure.

OBJECTIVE: To report the safe use of subcutaneous octreotide in the treatment of sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia in 2 patients with severe congestive heart failure.

CASE SUMMARY: Two patients with congestive heart failure with systolic dysfunction presented with severe hypoglycemia (blood glucose level: patient 1, 31 mg/dL; patient 2, 36 mg/dL) secondary to sulfonylurea agents. The mechanism of hypoglycemia was poor oral intake and prolonged half-life of the drugs due to renal failure. Hypoglycemia was refractory to glucose supplementation. Patient 1 received 2 doses of octreotide 50 microg subcutaneously 12 hours apart, with resolution of hypoglycemia (blood glucose level: <33 mg/dL before administration of octreotide, 62 mg/dL after first dose, 121 mg/dL after second dose). Patient 2 received an initial dose of octreotide 25 microg subcutaneously; hypoglycemia persisted after this dose, and the patient was given 2 doses of 50 microg subcutaneously 12 hours apart, leading to resolution of hypoglycemia (blood glucose level: 57 mg/dL before administration of octreotide, 80 mg/dL after first dose, 85 mg/dL after second dose, 146 mg/dL after third dose). Resolution of hypoglycemia with octreotide treatment obviated the need for prolonged intravenous dextrose infusions. No local or systemic adverse effects, especially cardiac adverse events, were noted during the course of treatment.

DISCUSSION: Octreotide is considered the antidote for sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia. It may be especially useful in patients with congestive heart failure who may not tolerate intravenous infusions of dextrose. The package insert cautions of the occurrence of cardiac adverse effects such as bradycardia, heart block, and worsening heart failure. Patients with heart failure may theoretically be at a higher risk of these adverse effects due to the concurrent use of atrioventricular blocking agents. However, a review of current literature reveals that the adverse effect profile depends on the route, dose, and formulation of the octreotide used along with the clinical indication. These adverse effects may not be clinically significant with the doses used for treatment of sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia and the benefits of the drug may outweigh the risks.

CONCLUSIONS: In these cases, octreotide was safely and effectively used in the treatment of sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia in patients with congestive heart failure by adhering to dosing guidelines and close monitoring.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app