JOURNAL ARTICLE

Noninvasive estimation of left ventricular filling pressures in patients with heart failure after surgical ventricular restoration and restrictive mitral annuloplasty

Ellen A ten Brinke, Matteo Bertini, Robert J Klautz, M Louisa Antoni, Eduard R Holman, Nico R van de Veire, Jeroen J Bax, Paul Steendijk
Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 2010, 140 (4): 807-15
20117802

OBJECTIVE: Doppler echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging, is widely applied to assess diastolic left ventricular function using early transmitral flow velocity combined with mitral annular velocity as a noninvasive estimate of left ventricular filling pressures. However, the accuracy of early transmitral flow velocity/mitral annular velocity in patients with heart failure, particularly after extensive cardiac surgery, is debated. Global diastolic strain rate during isovolumic relaxation obtained with 2-dimensional speckle-tracking analysis was recently proposed as an alternative approach to estimate left ventricular filling pressures.

METHODS: We analyzed diastolic function in patients with heart failure after surgical ventricular restoration and/or restrictive mitral annuloplasty. Echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle-tracking analysis, was performed to determine early transmitral flow velocity/atrial transmitral flow velocity, isovolumetric relaxation time, deceleration time, early transmitral flow velocity/mean mitral annular velocity, strain rate during isovolumic relaxation, and early transmitral flow velocity/strain rate during isovolumic relaxation. These noninvasive indices were correlated with relaxation time constant Tau, peak rate of pressure decline, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure obtained in the catheterization room using high-fidelity pressure catheters.

RESULTS: Twenty-three patients were analyzed 6 months after restrictive mitral annuloplasty (n = 8), surgical ventricular restoration (n = 4), or a combined procedure (n = 11). The strongest correlation with invasive indices, in particular left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, was found for strain rate during isovolumic relaxation (r = -0.76, P < .001). Early transmitral flow velocity/mean mitral annular velocity did not correlate significantly with any of the invasive indices. Strain rate during isovolumic relaxation (cutoff value < 0.38 s(-1)) accurately predicted left ventricular end-diastolic pressure of 16 mm Hg or more with 100% sensitivity and 93% specificity.

CONCLUSIONS: In a group of patients with heart failure who were investigated 6 months after cardiac surgery, early transmitral flow velocity/mean mitral annular velocity correlated poorly with invasively obtained diastolic indexes. Global strain rate during isovolumic relaxation, however, correlated well with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and peak rate of pressure decline. Our data suggest that global strain rate during isovolumic relaxation is a promising noninvasive index to assess left ventricular filling pressures in patients with heart failure after extensive cardiac surgery, including restrictive mitral annuloplasty and surgical ventricular restoration.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
20117802
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"