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Changing trends of peritonsillar abscess.

OBJECTIVE: This retrospective, cohort study aims to assess the changing characteristics of peritonsillar abscess (PTA).

METHOD: Data were obtained from PTA patient records admitted to a secondary hospital over a 10-year period.

RESULTS: A total of 427 patients, aged 31.6 +/- 15.2 years (range, 3-91), were treated for PTA, reflecting an incidence of 0.9/10 000/y. Forty-seven (11%) patients had more than one episode. There was no sex, seasonal, or side predominance. Thirteen (3%) patients developed complications. One hundred four (24.4%) patients were 40 years or older, had a longer hospital stay, and were prone to complications. One hundred two (23.8%) patients did not have an anteceding pharyngotonsillitis. Smoking was more common among patients with PTA as compared with the general population and was associated with more complications. A total of 283 (66.2%) patients developed PTA in spite of prior antibiotic therapy; 51.1% of smokers that received prior antibiotics had a higher incidence of Streptococcus viridans isolates.

CONCLUSION: Peritonsillar abscess may have changed its characteristics: affecting more older patients having a worse and longer course and PTA evolvement without anteceding tonsillitis or in spite of a prior adequate antibiotic therapy. Smoking may be a predisposing factor.

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