JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Fatigue and quality of life in pediatric multiple sclerosis.

Fatigue and quality of life are significant concerns in adult multiple sclerosis (MS) but little is known about these factors in pediatric MS. The present investigation evaluates fatigue and quality of life in 51 pediatric MS patients to determine the rate of fatigue and reduced quality of life and assesses the relations between these variables and clinical factors. Fatigue and quality of life were assessed by self- and parent-report via the PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale and the PedsQL Quality of Life Scale. One-sample t-tests determined if scores were below published data for healthy individuals. Moreover, scores falling one standard deviation from norms were considered mildly affected, with severe difficulties being defined as scores falling two or more standard deviations from norms. Associations between self- and parent-reported difficulties and clinical factors were examined via Pearson correlation analyses. In comparison with healthy samples, pediatric MS patients reported greater difficulties with respect to fatigue, sleep, cognition, physical limitations, and academics. In addition to significant difficulties on these factors, parents reported problems with respect to emotional functioning, and tended to report greater fatigue, sleep, and cognitive difficulties than were self-reported. Expanded Disability Status Scale score was the only neurologic variable significantly related to fatigue or quality of life scores. Fatigue was significantly correlated with reports of sleep difficulties, cognitive problems, and quality of life variables. These findings suggest that fatigue and poorer quality of life is a clear concern in pediatric MS, and is related to overall physical disability.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app