JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The role of calcium channel blockers in the treatment of essential hypertension.

Calcium channel blockers, originally developed for the treatment of angina and supraventricular arrhythmias, have been shown to lower elevated blood pressure effectively in hypertensive patients. Verapamil, nifedipine, and diltiazem represent prototype compounds for unique chemical classes with differing pharmacologic properties. These drugs lower elevated blood pressure with efficacy comparable with other commonly used antihypertensives. Combination therapy with other agents usually results in an additive response. Side effects are usually mild and reversible and usually are an extension of the drug's pharmacologic effects. Moreover, adverse metabolic effects on lipid, glucose, or potassium levels are not common. Because of the excellent antihypertensive effects of calcium channel blockers and their potential importance in a variety of other disease states, these agents should be routinely considered for use as a first-line antihypertensive agent in appropriately selected patients with hypertension of any severity as part of a comprehensive plan to minimize cardiovascular risk.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app