JOURNAL ARTICLE
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CardioWest temporary total artificial heart.

Perfusion 2009 September
BACKGROUND: The CardioWest temporary total artificial heart (TAH-t) replaces both native ventricles of the heart and is more beneficial for a select group of patients than most other typical ventricular assist devices (VADs). This review will expand on the current literature and highlight the chronology of this device. The CardioWest TAH-t has been implanted in over 715 patients at 30 multiple institutional centers worldwide as a bridge-to-transplant (BTT) since 1993. The mechanical flow dynamics of the device are manufactured and designed differently from other traditional VADs, allowing increased outputs and normal filling pressures, allowing for sufficient organ and tissue perfusion and dramatic recoveries, allowing patients to return to an almost normal quality of life.

RESULTS: There was a 79% survival to transplant achievement in the protocol group who received the TAH-t versus a 46% in the control group (P < 0.001). Furthermore, there was a 70% survival rate at one year in the protocol group versus 31% in the control group (P < 0.001). The one- and five-year survival rates after transplantation were 69% and 34%, respectively, in the control group and 86% and 64%, respectively, in the protocol group.

CONCLUSION: It is evident that the advancement of modern engineering and medicine has made way for a reliable and durable device that provides a promising future in the field of end-stage heart failure.

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