COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Population-based outcomes following endovascular and open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

Kristina A Giles, Allen D Hamdan, Frank B Pomposelli, Mark C Wyers, Suzanne E Dahlberg, Marc L Schermerhorn
Journal of Endovascular Therapy 2009, 16 (5): 554-64
19842719

PURPOSE: To evaluate national outcomes after endovascular and open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA).

METHODS: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was interrogated to identify all repairs between 2000 and 2005 for rAAA based on ICD-9 codes. In the study period, 2323 patients (1794 men; median age 75 years, range 45-98) with rAAAs had endovascular repair, while 26,106 patients (20,311 men; median age 73 years, range 22-99) had an open procedure. Outcomes included in-hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), complications, and hospitalization charge. A secondary analysis was performed to compare outcomes from low-, medium-, and high-volume institutions based on annual rAAA repair volume.

RESULTS: Patients in the endovascular group were significantly older (p<0.05). Mortality was 41% overall: 33% and 41% for endovascular versus open repair, respectively (p<0.001). Mortality after endovascular repair was lower than open surgery for patients >or=70 years (36% versus 47%, p<0.001), but not for those <70 years (24% versus 30%, p = 0.15). LOS was shorter after endovascular repair (7 versus 9 days, p<0.001). Respiratory complications (8% versus 4%, p<0.05) and acute renal failure were more common following open repair (30% versus 23%, p<0.01). Costs were similar (endo $73,590 versus open $67,287, p = 0.15). Mortality decreased as hospital surgical volume increased (low 44%, medium 39%, high 38%; p<0.001). Over time, endovascular repair utilization increased more rapidly at high-volume centers, and a lower mortality was seen with endovascular repair at high-volume compared to low-volume hospitals (22% versus 44%, p<0.001). Multivariate predictors of mortality were age, female gender, lower hospital surgical volume, open repair, and year of surgery.

CONCLUSION: This population-based study found that mortality associated with rAAAs may be improved by the performance of endovascular repair, especially in older patients. Mortality after rAAA for both endovascular and open repairs was also lower at high-volume institutions.

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