JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Self-reported effects of Ménière's disease on the individual's life: a qualitative analysis.

Otology & Neurotology 2010 Februrary
OBJECTIVE: To define the main consequences of Ménière's disease as perceived by individuals with the condition.

STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Open-ended questionnaire sent to a 1-in-6 sample of members of the Finnish Ménière's Association.

PATIENTS: Two hundred members of the Finnish Ménière's Association reporting a diagnosis compatible with the condition.

INTERVENTION(S): Postal questionnaire, including the question "Please make a list of the main effects that your Ménière's disorder has on your life."

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Number of respondents listing 1 or more consequences of their condition. Categories of responses listed and numbers of responses within the different categories as defined by World Health Organization-International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

RESULTS: There was a 79% response rate to the overall questionnaire, and 91% of the respondents listed 1 or more consequences of their Ménière's disease, with a mean of 3.4 consequences listed. These were divided according to the categories listed in International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Seventy percent of the respondents listed impairments, 39% activity limitations, 47% participation restrictions, 16% effects on environmental factors, and 28% on personal contextual factors. Although most impairments covered the main symptoms of the condition, 19% of the respondents listed "mental effects." Mobility problems were reported by more than half of those listing activity limitations, with most of the remainder being "communication." The 2 main areas of participation restrictions commonly reported were "community, social and civic life" and "work and employment."

CONCLUSION: Most individuals with Ménière's disease are able to specify important consequences (principally participation restrictions and activity limitations), many of which are not identified in symptom-orientated approaches.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app