JOURNAL ARTICLE

Joint associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with body mass index: results from a time use survey of US adults

G F Dunton, D Berrigan, R Ballard-Barbash, B Graubard, A A Atienza
International Journal of Obesity 2009, 33 (12): 1427-36
19806160

OBJECTIVE: Obesity risk is negatively associated with physical activity and positively associated with time spent in sedentary behaviors. Yet, it is not known how different combinations of sedentary and active behavior are associated with body mass index (BMI). This study examined the interaction between time spent in physical activity and sedentary behavior on BMI in US adults.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional, data from the 2006 American Time Use Survey.

SUBJECTS: 10 984 non-underweight adults (aged 21 + years).

MEASUREMENT: A phone interview assessed all activities performed in the past 24 h, height, weight, health status, and other sociodemographic characteristics. Time spent in (1) moderate-to-vigorous leisure-time physical activity (MVPA), (2) active transportation (walking, biking), (3) sedentary leisure activities (TV/movie watching, computer use, playing games, reading), and (4) sedentary transportation (motorized vehicles) was determined from activity coding. BMI was calculated.

RESULTS: After adjusting for age, gender, education level, race/ethnicity, and health status, sample-weighted linear regressions found significant interactions for leisure MVPA x TV/movies, leisure MVPA x playing games, active transportation x sedentary transportation, and active transportation x reading (Ps<0.0001). For example, the group of adults watching <60 min per day of TV/movies and engaging in > or =60 min per day of leisure MVPA had lower average BMI compared to the group watching <60 min per day of TV/movies and reporting <60 min per day of leisure MVPA (P<0.0001). In contrast, for adults watching > or =189 min per day of TV/movies, there was not a significant difference in BMI by time spent in leisure MVPA.

CONCLUSION: Data from a US time use survey indicate that the strength of the association between certain types of sedentary behavior and BMI varies according to time spent in certain types of physical activity and vice versa.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
19806160
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"