JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Effects of exercise on insulin sensitivity, inflammatory cytokines, and serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5a in obese Chinese male adolescents.

The benefits of exercise on glucose metabolism, inflammation, and serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5a (TRACP 5a) protein levels in Chinese male adolescents have not been extensively analyzed. Therefore, we examined the effects of a 12-week exercise program on weight, adiposity, insulin sensitivity (IS), and inflammatory marker expression, including the novel macrophage marker TRACP 5a, in obese Chinese male adolescents. A total of 106 male adolescents were recruited from the Army Academy in Taiwan and classified as lean (body mass index [BMI], 20.9 +/- 0.2 kg/m(2)) or obese (BMI, 27.7 +/- 0.2 kg/m(2)). Body composition, IS, and inflammatory markers were measured in both groups at baseline and in the obese group after completion of a 12-week exercise program. Body weight, BMI, waist circumference, body fat mass and percentage, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, fasting plasma glucose, fasting serum insulin, 2-hour postchallenge plasma glucose concentration, interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and serum TRACP 5a were significantly higher in the obese group as compared with the lean group. In addition, serum TRACP 5a was positively correlated with body mass and fat indices. After completion of the exercise program, significant reductions in all anthropometric, metabolic, and inflammatory indicators, with the exception of serum TRACP 5a were observed. Although the obese participants remained obese, exercise training significantly improved IS and reduced interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5a remained unaffected by exercise training, consistent with our hypothesis that it is associated with increased adipose tissue in obese individuals.

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