JOURNAL ARTICLE

Relationship between maximal squat strength and five, ten, and forty yard sprint times

Jeffrey M McBride, Daniel Blow, Tyler J Kirby, Tracie L Haines, Andrea M Dayne, N Travis Triplett
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 2009, 23 (6): 1633-6
19675504
The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationship between maximal squat strength and sprinting times. Seventeen Division I-AA male football athletes (height = 1.78 +/- 0.04 m, body mass [BM] = 85.9 +/- 8.8 kg, body mass index [BMI] = 27.0 +/- 2.6 kg/m2, 1 repetition maximum [1RM] = 166.5 +/- 34.1 kg, 1RM/BM = 1.94 +/- 0.33) participated in this investigation. Height, weight, and squat strength (1RM) were assessed on day 1. Within 1 week, 5, 10, and 40 yard sprint times were assessed. Squats were performed to a 70 degree knee angle and values expressed relative to each subject's BM. Sprints were performed on a standard outdoor track surface with timing gates placed at the previously mentioned distances. Statistically significant (p < or = 0.05) correlations were found between squat 1RM/BM and 40 yard sprint times (r = -0.605, p = 0.010, power = 0.747) and 10 yard sprint times (r = -0.544, p = 0.024, power = 0.626). The correlation approached significance between 5 yard sprint times and 1RM/BM (r = -0.4502, p = 0.0698, power = 0.4421). Subjects were then divided into those above 1RM/BM of 2.10 and below 1RM/BM of 1.90. Subjects with a 1RM/BM above 2.10 had statistically significantly lower sprint times at 10 and 40 yards in comparison with those subjects with a 1RM/BM ratio below 1.90. This investigation provides additional evidence of the possible importance of maximal squat strength relative to BM concerning sprinting capabilities in competitive athletes.

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