Comparative Study
Journal Article
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Duplex ultrasonography in the diagnosis of celiac and mesenteric artery occlusive disease.

Duplex ultrasound criteria for the diagnosis of celiac and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusive disease have not been well defined. We performed a blinded retrospective comparison of mesenteric duplex data with arteriography in 24 consecutive patients who underwent both studies. Arteriography revealed that eight superior mesenteric arteries were normal; five were minimally stenotic; eight had stenoses greater than or equal to 50%, and three were occluded. Nine celiac arteries were normal or minimally stenotic; 12 had stenoses greater than or equal to 50%, and three were occluded. Duplex scans were obtained after an overnight fast. In normal superior mesenteric arteries, peak systolic velocity (PSV) was 134 +/- 18 cm/sec and end-diastolic velocity (EDV) was 24 +/- 4 cm/sec. Superior mesenteric artery PSV in patients with minimal or no stenosis (171 +/- 22 cm/sec) was less than PSV in patients with severe (greater than 50%) stenosis (299 +/- 40 cm/sec, p = 0.006), and less than PSV in patients with patent superior mesenteric arteries who underwent revascularization (366 +/- 86 cm/sec, p = 0.017). Similarly, EDV was elevated in superior mesenteric arteries with severe stenosis (78 +/- 11 cm/sec, p = 0.001) and in patients who underwent revascularization (111 +/- 19 cm/sec, p less than 0.001) compared to those with less than 50% stenosis (30 +/- 6 cm/sec, p = 0.001). An EDV greater than 45 cm/sec was the best indicator of severe stenosis (sensitivity, 1.0; specificity, 0.92). Peak systolic velocity greater than 300 cm/sec was less sensitive (0.63), but highly specific (1.0) for severe superior mesenteric artery stenosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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