JOURNAL ARTICLE

Person-centred interactions between nurses and patients during medication activities in an acute hospital setting: qualitative observation and interview study

Danielle Bolster, Elizabeth Manias
International Journal of Nursing Studies 2010, 47 (2): 154-65
19577752

BACKGROUND: There is increasing emphasis on person-centred care within the literature and the health care context. It is suggested that a person-centred approach to medication activities has the potential to improve patient experiences and outcomes.

OBJECTIVES: This study set out to examine how nurses and patients interact with each other during medication activities in an acute care environment with an underlying philosophy of person-centred care.

DESIGN: A qualitative approach was used comprising naturalistic observation and semi-structured interviews.

SETTING: The study setting was an acute care ward with a collaboratively developed philosophy of person-centre care, in an Australian metropolitan hospital.

PARTICIPANTS: Eleven nurses of varying levels of experience were recruited to participate in observations and interviews. Nurses were eligible to participate if they were employed on the study ward in a role that incorporated direct patient care, including medication activities. A stratified sampling technique ensured that nurses with a range of years of clinical experience were represented. Patients who were being cared for by participating nurses during the observation period were recruited to participate unless they met the following exclusion criteria: those less than 18 years of age, non-English speaking patients, and those who were unable to give informed consent. Twenty-five patients were observed and 16 of those agreed to be interviewed.

RESULTS: The results of the study generated insights into the nature of interactions between nurses and patients where person-centred care is the underlying philosophy of care. Three major themes emerged from the findings: provision of individualised care, patient participation and contextual barriers to providing person-centred care. While the participating nurses valued a person-centred approach and perceived that they were conducting medication activities in a person-centred way, some nurse-patient interactions during medication activities were centred on routines rather than individualised patient assessment and management. These interactions were based on nurses' perceptions of what was important for the patient and did not provide opportunities for patient participation. Two main contextual barriers in relation to a person-centred approach to medication activities were identified as multidisciplinary communication and time constraints.

CONCLUSIONS: While some nurse-patient interactions during medication activities were consistent with the principles of person-centred care, the study results highlighted factors that influence the nature of these interactions, and identified opportunities to improve nursing practice. To ensure person-centred care is applied to medication activities, nurses should undertake ongoing assessment of patients' needs in relation to their medications and encourage opportunities for increased patient participation.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
19577752
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"