JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Why is community-associated MRSA spreading across the world and how will it change clinical practice?

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) emerged in 1960 and over the following 40 years was a problem confined largely to the healthcare setting. In the late 1990s the first US reports of so-called community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections appeared. CA-MRSA infections were defined as MRSA infections occurring in patients who had no identifiable predisposing risk factors, such as healthy children and young adults. CA-MRSA is associated with a novel genetic profile and phenotype; it is remarkably fit and capable of spreading within communities, it is virulent and is often susceptible to multiple narrow-spectrum antimicrobials other than beta-lactams. CA-MRSA infections involve predominantly skin and soft tissue; however, necrotizing pneumonia and necrotizing fasciitis have been described. At present, several reports suggest that CA-MRSA may be replacing the hospital-acquired MRSA strains (HA-MRSA), with potentially catastrophic consequences. Given the rapid spread and the high virulence of CA-MRSA, global strategies are needed. Prompt, appropriate treatment, guided by the site and type of infection and risk factors for HA-MRSA or CA-MRSA, increases the chances of a successful outcome and is urgently needed.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app