Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Cervical-artery dissections: predisposing factors, diagnosis, and outcome.

Cervical-artery dissection (CAD) is a major cause of cerebral ischaemia in young adults and can lead to various clinical symptoms, some of which are benign (eg, headache, neck pain, Horner's syndrome, and cranial-nerve palsy), but most patients have a stroke or transient ischaemic attack. In addition to trauma to the neck, other risk factors have been suggested, such as infection, migraine, hyperhomocysteinaemia, and the 677TT genotype of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR 677TT), although evidence is sparse. An underlying arteriopathy, which could in part be genetically determined, is believed to have a role in the development of CAD. Importantly, both research on and optimum management of CAD strongly rely on diagnostic accuracy. Although the functional outcome of CAD is good in most patients, socioprofessional effects can be important. Incidence of the disorder in the general population is underestimated. Mortality and short-term recurrence rates are low but possibly also underestimated. Further research is warranted to improve our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, to assess the long-term outcome, and ultimately to provide treatment and prevention strategies.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app