JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gender differences in axis I and axis II comorbidity in patients with borderline personality disorder

André Tadić, Stefanie Wagner, Julia Hoch, Omur Başkaya, Robert von Cube, Christian Skaletz, Klaus Lieb, Norbert Dahmen
Psychopathology 2009, 42 (4): 257-63
19521142

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Differences in the clinical presentation of men and women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are of potential interest for investigations into the neurobiology, genetics, natural history, and treatment response of BPD. The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in axis I and axis II comorbidity and in diagnostic criteria in BPD patients.

METHODS: 110 women and 49 men with BPD were assessed with the computer-based version of the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders. Gender differences were investigated for the following outcomes: (a) lifetime, 12-month and 4-week prevalence of axis I disorders; (b) axis II disorders, and (c) DSM-IV BPD diagnostic criteria.

RESULTS: With regard to lifetime prevalence of axis I disorders, men more often displayed a substance use disorder, in particular alcohol dependency (65 vs. 43%); on the other hand, women more frequently had an affective (94 vs. 82%), anxiety (92 vs. 80%) or eating disorder (35 vs. 18%), in particular anorexia nervosa (21 vs. 4%). Regarding the 12-month prevalence, we found significantly more women suffering from anorexia nervosa (13 vs. 0%). Considering the 4-week prevalence, there were no significant gender differences. With regard to axis II disorders, men had a higher frequency of antisocial personality disorder (57 vs. 26%). Regarding the BPD diagnostic criteria, men more often displayed 'intensive anger' (74 vs. 49%), whereas women more frequently showed 'affective instability' (94 vs. 82%).

CONCLUSION: In this German study, we could replicate and extend the findings from previous US studies, where men and women with BPD showed important differences in their pattern of psychiatric comorbidity. The implications for clinicians and researchers are discussed.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
19521142
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"