COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cigarette smoke condensate affects the collagen-degrading ability of human gingival fibroblasts

W Zhang, F Song, L J Windsor
Journal of Periodontal Research 2009, 44 (6): 704-13
19453854

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cigarette smoke condensate, the particulate matter of cigarette smoke, is composed of thousands of chemicals, including nicotine. Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for periodontal disease. This study investigated the influence of cigarette smoke condensate on the collagen-degrading ability of human gingival fibroblasts and its mechanism.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Human gingival fibroblasts were exposed for 72 h to various concentrations of total particulate matter cigarette smoke condensate. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were evaluated using water-soluble tetrazolium-1 and lactate dehydrogenase, respectively. The collagen-degrading ability of human gingival fibroblasts was evaluated in collagen-coated six-well plates. Conditioned media and membrane extracts were collected for zymography and western blot analyses of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs).

RESULTS: Cell proliferation decreased and cytotoxicity increased in human gingival fibroblasts with increasing concentrations of cigarette smoke condensate. Cell proliferation decreased by more than 50% (p < 0.05) when the concentrations of total particulate matter cigarette smoke condensate were above 200 microg/mL, and cytotoxicity increased to more than 30% (p < 0.05) when the concentrations of total particulate matter cigarette smoke condensate were above 400 microg/mL. Cigarette smoke condensate increased the collagen-degrading ability of human gingival fibroblasts, especially at a concentration of 100 microg/mL (1.5-fold increase, p < 0.05) compared with the control. Cigarette smoke condensate increased the production of proMMP-1, proMMP-2, MMP-14 and TIMP-1, and decreased the production of TIMP-2, in conditioned media. Furthermore, compared with the control group, cigarette smoke condensate increased the production of MMP-2, MMP-14 and TIMP-2 in membrane extracts, especially at concentrations of 50-100 microg/mL.

CONCLUSION: Cigarette smoke condensate affects human gingival fibroblast proliferation and is toxic at total particulate matter cigarette smoke condensate concentrations of >or= 400 microg/mL. Cigarette smoke condensate can increase the collagen-degrading ability of human gingival fibroblasts by altering the production and localization of MMPs and TIMPs.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
19453854
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"