CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Herpes simplex virus type 2 (Mollaret's) meningitis: a case report.

INTRODUCTION: Mollaret's meningitis is an unusual and under-appreciated syndrome of benign, recurrent aseptic meningitis. The available literature indicates that the causative agent is herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in the majority of cases and much less frequently herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1).

CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 49-year-old Indian female who had four attacks of recurrent lymphocytic meningitis (Mollaret's meningitis) occurring over a 7-year period. The diagnosis of herpes simplex meningitis was made at the time of the fourth episode by a positive PCR for herpes simplex virus infection in the cerebrospinal fluid. During the first three episodes, the patient was treated with anti-tuberculous drugs and antibiotics for bacterial meningitis; however for the last episode, once the diagnosis of herpes simplex meningitis was confirmed, only symptomatic treatment was given. No long-term suppressive therapy was given and no recurrence has been experienced so far.

CONCLUSIONS: Mollaret's meningitis should be suspected in all cases of recurrent lymphocytic meningitis. Early diagnosis may prevent prolonged hospital admissions, unnecessary investigations, and exposure to unnecessary medications, with the associated considerable costs. Treatment with acyclovir may be beneficial in decreasing the severity and duration of attacks and in preventing further episodes. [Au?1].

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