Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effect of long-term endurance and strength training on metabolic control and arterial elasticity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Poor glucose control increases the risk of vascular complications and cardiovascular mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a long-term exercise training program on metabolic control and arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 DM. Fifty men with DM (age 52.3 +/- 5.6 years) were randomly assigned to the exercise training (E) or standard treatment for DM (control [C]) group for 24 months. Supervised exercise training included both endurance and muscle strength training 4 times/week. All exercise sessions were controlled by heart rate and intensity. Glycated hemoglobin A1c, insulin, leptin, blood lipids, blood pressure, maximal oxygen consumption in spiroergometry, and muscle strength were measured every 6 months. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity. Maximal oxygen consumption in spiroergometry (E 31.9 to 34.8 vs C 32.6 to 31.8 ml/kg/min; p = 0.003), muscle strength (sit-up test, E 12.7 to 20.8 vs C 14.6 to 13.1 times; p <0.001), hemoglobin A1c (E 8.2% to 7.6% vs C 8.0% to 8.3%; p = 0.006), and leptin (E 7.4 to 6.7 vs C 7.4 to 7.9 microg/L; p = 0.013) improved significantly in the E group, but no change or worsening in these variables occurred in the C group. Body weight was not different between groups at 2 years. However, pulse wave velocity increased in both groups (E +0.600 vs C +1.300 m/s; p = 0.27). In conclusion, long-term endurance and strength training was effective and resulted in improved metabolic control of DM compared with standard treatment. Despite significant cardiovascular risk reduction, conduit arterial elasticity did not improve.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app