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D-dimer is useful in the diagnosis of cortical venous sinus thrombosis.

BACKGROUND: Estimations of D-dimer correlate with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism and may serve as a marker of cortical venous sinus thrombosis (CVST).

AIM: To study the usefulness of D-dimer in the diagnosis of CVST.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 26 patients with CVST were subjected to a detailed medical history and neurological evaluation. A cranial MRI was carried out on a 1.5T scanner using T1, T2, and DWI sequences and two-dimensional time of flight MR venography. D-dimer was estimated using a rapid latex agglutination slide test using monoclonal antibodies.

RESULTS: The age of patients ranged between 16 and 70 years old (median 31 years old); 8 were males and were examined after a mean duration of 22 days of symptoms. Cortical venous thrombosis was attributed to puerperium in 4 patients, infection in 5 patients, and pregnancy, dehydration, insect bite, and migraine in 1 patient each. Superior sagittal sinus was involved in 15 patients, transverse sinus in 16 patients, straight sinus in 3 patients, sigmoid sinus in 7 patients, and cavernous and deep system in 1 patient each. A total of 12 patients had more than one sinus involvement. D-dimer was positive in 20 patients and correlated with the duration of symptoms but not with the extent of sinus thrombosis and the outcome.

CONCLUSION: D-dimer is useful in patients suspected of CVST and patients with positive test results should be urgently sent for MR imaging.

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