JOURNAL ARTICLE

Combined glenoid and humeral head allograft reconstruction for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability

Fotios P Tjoumakaris, Jon K Sekiya
Orthopedics 2008, 31 (5): 497
19292306
Recurrent glenohumeral instability can be a challenging therapeutic problem to orthopedic surgeons. Oftentimes, recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability is associated with a host of capsular, labral, and occasionally, osseous deficiencies. Current treatment strategies for significant bony deficiency within the shoulder are aimed at nonanatomic restoration of glenohumeral anatomy with resultant limitation in range of motion parameters. While these techniques may prevent recurrence of instability, the resulting loss of motion and decreased function may not be suitable for young, active individuals. This case report presents a patient with recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability from a combined, large glenoid and humeral head bone deficiency. A novel surgical technique of restoring both humeral and glenoid bone is introduced as a way to prevent decreased motion after surgery while still maintaining stability. This reconstruction offers a more anatomic restoration of bone deficiency with the desired effect of achieving a more complete postoperative range of motion, while still conferring stability. The patient has returned to activities of daily living.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
19292306
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"