Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Vascular-specific laser wavelength for the treatment of facial telangiectasias.

BACKGROUND: Facial telangiectasias have been successfully treated with a variety of laser wavelengths. Shorter wavelengths (532 nm) are generally effective in the treatment of smaller vessels; longer wavelengths (1064 nm), although potentially more effective in the treatment of larger vessels, may be associated with a higher complication rate. The 980-nm wavelength has the potential benefits of a longer wavelength with the safety of shorter wavelengths.

OBJECTIVE: The efficacy and safety of a new 980-nm diode laser in the treatment of facial telangiectasias was evaluated.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve subjects, aged 44 to 67 years with Fitzpatrick skin types 1 to 3 and bilateral facial telangiectasias, underwent 1 to 3 monthly treatments with a 980-nm diode laser using fluences ranging from 22.2 to 146.9 J/cm2, pulse durations of 50-160 ms, spot sizes of 0.7 to 1 mm, and pulse frequencies of 3 to 10 Hz. Clinical evaluation included digital photography, as well as subject and investigator assessment of reduction in the size and appearance of telangiectasias on a 1 to 5 point scale. Adverse effects were also assessed.

RESULTS: Significant improvement in the appearance of telangiectasias was seen after treatment. No complications were observed.

CONCLUSION: A new 980-nm diode laser effectively treats facial telangiectasias without any observed complications.

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