JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A multicenter study on the clinical outcome of chorioamnionitis in preterm infants.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of clinical maternal chorioamnionitis on morbidity and mortality rates among infants who are at < 33 weeks of gestation, adjusted for patient characteristics that included admission neonatal illness severity (Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology, version II; SNAP-II).

STUDY DESIGN: With multivariate logistic regression analysis, prospectively collected hospital outcomes from the Canadian Neonatal Network of singleton infants with birth gestational age of < 33 weeks and clinical chorioamnionitis were compared retrospectively with nonexposed infants.

RESULTS: Of 3094 infants, 477 infants (15.4%) who were exposed to clinical chorioamnionitis had significantly higher admission SNAP-II scores. Bivariate analysis revealed that the neonatal mortality rate was increased significantly in the chorioamnionitis group (10.6% vs 6.1%). Multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for illness severity indicated that chorioamnionitis was associated with an increased risk of early sepsis (odds ratio, 5.54; 95% confidence interval, 2.87-10.69) and severe intraventricular hemorrhage (odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.24) but not neonatal death.

CONCLUSION: Preterm infants who are exposed to clinical chorioamnionitis have an increased risk of early-onset sepsis and severe intraventricular hemorrhage.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app