COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Enhanced transcription of complement and coagulation genes in the absence of adaptive immunity.

A recessive nonsense mutation in the zebrafish recombination activating gene 1 (rag1) gene results in defective V(D)J recombination; however, animals homozygous for this mutation (rag1(-/-)) are reportedly viable and fertile in standard, nonsterile aquarium conditions but display increased mortality after intraperitoneal injection with mycobacteria. Based on their survival in nonsterile environments, we hypothesized that the rag1(-/-) zebrafish may possess an "enhanced" innate immune response to compensate for the lack of an adaptive immune system. To test this hypothesis, microarray analyses were used to compare the expression profiles of the intestines and hematopoietic kidneys of rag1 deficient zebrafish to the expression profiles of control (heterozygous) siblings. The expression levels of 12 genes were significantly altered in the rag1(-/-) kidney including the up regulation of a putative interferon stimulated gene, and the down regulation of genes encoding fatty acid binding protein 10, keratin 5 and multiple heat shock proteins. The expression levels of 87 genes were shown to be significantly altered in the rag1(-/-) intestine; the majority of these differences reflect increased expression of innate immune genes, including those of the coagulation and complement pathways. Subsequent analyses of orthologous coagulation and complement genes in Rag1(-/-) mice indicate increased transcription of the complement C4 gene in the Rag1(-/-) intestine.

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