JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Trabeculectomy with mitomycin C for neovascular glaucoma: prognostic factors for surgical failure.

PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic factors for surgical outcomes of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (MMC) for neovascular glaucoma (NVG).

DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.

METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of 101 patients (101 eyes) with NVG treated at Kumamoto University Hospital. The primary endpoint was persistent intraocular pressure > or = 22 mm Hg, deterioration of visual acuity to no light perception, and additional glaucoma procedures. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model.

RESULTS: The mean follow-up period was 29.3 months (range, 0.5 to 142.3 months). The probability of success 1, 2, and 5 years after trabeculectomy was 62.6%, 58.2%, and 51.7%, respectively. The multivariate model showed that younger age (relative risk [RR], 0.96/year; P = .0007) and previous vitrectomy (RR, 1.62; P = .02) were prognostic factors for surgical failure among all NVG patients. Additionally, an eye with unremoved proliferative membrane and/or unrepaired retinal detachment (RD) after vitrectomy (RR, 1.59; P = .05) was a probable prognostic factor in a subgroup of 66 eyes with previous vitrectomy, and having a fellow eye with NVG (RR, 1.73; P = .003) was a significant prognostic factor in 82 eyes with NVG attributable to diabetic retinopathy.

CONCLUSIONS: The prognostic factors for surgical failure of trabeculectomy with MMC for NVG were younger age and previous vitrectomy in all NVG patients, and having a fellow eye with NVG in patients with disease caused by diabetic retinopathy. Persistent proliferative membrane and/or RD after vitrectomy might contribute to poorer outcomes of trabeculectomy.

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