JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
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Evaluation of the potential use of trabecular bone score to complement bone mineral density in the diagnosis of osteoporosis: a preliminary spine BMD-matched, case-control study.

The trabecular bone score (TBS) is a new parameter that is determined from gray-level analysis of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images. It relies on the mean thickness and volume fraction of trabecular bone microarchitecture. This was a preliminary case-control study to evaluate the potential diagnostic value of TBS as a complement to bone mineral density (BMD), by comparing postmenopausal women with and without fractures. The sample consisted of 45 women with osteoporotic fractures (5 hip fractures, 20 vertebral fractures, and 20 other types of fracture) and 155 women without a fracture. Stratification was performed, taking into account each type of fracture (except hip), and women with and without fractures were matched for age and spine BMD. BMD and TBS were measured at the total spine. TBS measured at the total spine revealed a significant difference between the fracture and age- and spine BMD-matched nonfracture group, when considering all types of fractures and vertebral fractures. In these cases, the diagnostic value of the combination of BMD and TBS likely will be higher compared with that of BMD alone. TBS, as evaluated from standard DXA scans directly, potentially complements BMD in the detection of osteoporotic fractures. Prospective studies are necessary to fully evaluate the potential role of TBS as a complementary risk factor for fracture.

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