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JOURNAL ARTICLE

Reperfusion rate and inhospital mortality of patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction diagnosed already in the prehospital phase: results of the German Prehospital Myocardial Infarction Registry (PREMIR)

Uwe Zeymer, Hans-Richard Arntz, Burkhardt Dirks, Klaus Ellinger, Harald Genzwürker, Lutz Nibbe, Ulrich Tebbe, Jochen Senges, Steffen Schneider et al.
Resuscitation 2009, 80 (4): 402-6
19167147

AIMS: We sought to evaluate the in-hospital fate of patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) diagnosed already in the prehospital phase by physican equipped ambulances.

METHODS: A total of 2326 consecutive STEMI patients were included in PREMIR. For this analysis 218 patients with prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation were excluded.

RESULTS: The median time between symptom onset and 12-lead ECG was 85 min. The median time intervals between the diagnostic 12-lead ECG and prehospital fibrinolysis were 10 min, until inhospital fibrinolysis 52 min and until primar PCI 86min, respectively. Reperfusion therapy with prehospital fibrinolysis (24%), inhospital fibrinolysis (13%) or primary PCI (45%) was performed in 82% of the patients. Inhospital mortality was 6.0% in patients with prehospital fibrinolysis (n = 504), 5.8% in patients with inhospital fibrinolysis (n = 278), 4.5% in patients with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 962) and 16.2% in patients without early reperfusion therapy (n = 377), respectively. In the multivariate propensity score analysis comparing prehospital fibrinolysis and primary PCI we observed no significant difference in the odds for in-hospital mortality (odds ratio: 1.57, 95% CI: 0.94-2.63). The final discharge diagnosis was STEMI in 90% of the patients, in patients with prehospital fibrinolysis 95%.

CONCLUSIONS: In patients with STEMI already diagnosed in the prehospital phase the ischemic time is short, accuracy of the diagnosis is high and reperfusion therapy is performed in over 82%. Inhospital mortality was not different between prehospital fibrinolysis and primary PCI.

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