JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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The therapeutic effect of OK-432 (picibanil) sclerotherapy for benign neck cysts.

Laryngoscope 2008 December
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In general, benign neck cysts are treated by surgical excision. This can present technical difficulties and frequent recurrences, because of insufficient surgery. Sclerosing agents such as OK-432 have been tested for the nonsurgical treatment of these cysts. We have assessed the efficacy of OK-432 sclerotherapy for benign neck cysts.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study group consisted of 75 patients (42 men, 33 women) diagnosed with and treated for benign neck cysts between March 2001 and December 2007 by intralesional injection of OK-432. The liquid content of each cyst was aspirated as much as possible, and the same volume of OK-432 solution was injected. Patients were assessed by ultrasonography or computerized tomography, and therapeutic outcomes and adverse effects were evaluated by patient age, sex, cyst type, and number of injections.

RESULTS: Of the 75 treated patients, 31 (41.3%) showed total shrinkage, seven (9.3%) showed near-total shrinkage (>90% of cyst volume), five (6.6%) showed marked shrinkage (>70% of cyst volume), and 17 (22.7%) showed partial shrinkage (<70% of cyst volume). No response was seen in 15 patients (20%). Despite repeated sclerotherapy, eight patients (10.7%) showed recurrences. Minor adverse effects of therapy included fever, localized pain, and odynophagia but these complications spontaneously disappeared within several days.

CONCLUSIONS: OK-432 sclerotherapy is a safe and effective primary alternative to surgery in patients with benign neck cysts.

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