Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Redifferentiation therapy with 13-cis retinoic acids in radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer.

Radioiodine (I-131) therapy is of proven efficacy for treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). However, loss of differentiation in recurrent or metastatic DTC which decrease I-131 uptake may decrease the efficacy of I-131 therapy. Therefore, strategies to improve I-131 uptake are mandatory. This study is an open label clinical study to evaluate the effectiveness of 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA) for improving I-131 uptake in recurrent or metastatic of DTC with defective I-131 uptake. Eleven patients (Age 27-66 years, M : F=4 : 7) were given 13-cis RA (1.5 mg/kg daily for 5 weeks), followed by 200 mCi (7.4 GBq) I-131 treatment. The differences of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level and I-131 uptake on the post-treatment whole body scan (RxWBS) were compared before and after 13-cis RA therapy. Six out of 11 patients showed significantly increased (above 50%) Tg levels just after RA therapy. However, Tg levels a year after I-131 therapy were increased, stable and decreased in 7, 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Iodine uptake on RxWBS showed marginal improvement in only 2 patients and their Tg levels after one year follow-up increased. Most frequent adverse events were dry skin and lips. 13-cis RA partially restores I-131 uptake in few patients with recurrent or metastatic DTC. The use of 13-cis RA in current protocol has only limited usefulness and is not routinely recommended as currently used protocol.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app