Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Hamstring muscle kinematics and activation during overground sprinting.

Journal of Biomechanics 2008 November 15
Hamstring muscle strain injury is one of the most commonly seen injuries in sports such as track and field, soccer, football, and rugby. The purpose of this study was to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of hamstring muscle strain injuries during over ground sprinting by investigating hamstring muscle-tendon kinematics and muscle activation. Three-dimensional videographic and electromyographic (EMG) data were collected for 20 male runners, soccer or lacrosse players performing overground sprinting at their maximum effort. Hamstring muscle-tendon lengths, elongation velocities, and linear envelop EMG data were analyzed for a running gait cycle of the dominant leg. Hamstring muscles exhibited eccentric contractions during the late stance phase as well as during the late swing phase of overground sprinting. The peak eccentric contraction speeds of the hamstring muscles were significantly greater during the late swing phase than during the late stance phase (p=0.001) while the hamstring muscle-tendon lengths at the peak eccentric contraction speeds were significantly greater during the late stance phase than during the late swing phase (p=0.001). No significant differences existed in the maximum hamstring muscle-tendon lengths between the two eccentric contractions. The potential for hamstring muscle strain injury exists during the late stance phase as well as during the late swing phases of overground sprinting.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app