Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Telangiectatic osteogenic sarcoma of the extremities. Results in 17 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

Seventeen patients with telangiectatic osteogenic sarcoma (TOS) of the extremities were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, according to two different protocols. Preoperatively, the patients received high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) and cisplatinum (CPD) (HD-MTX/CPD) and doxorubicin. CPD was delivered intraarterially, the other drugs intravenously. Limb-salvage surgery was performed in 12 instances, and five patients were treated with amputation. Postoperative chemotherapy was tailored according to the grade of chemotherapy-induced necrosis. In 13 cases (86%), the resultant grade of necrosis was greater than 90% (good responders). The mean follow-up interval was 3.5 years with a range of 18 to 78 months. Fourteen patients (82%) remained continuously disease-free, while three patients developed lung metastases. Two of these died because of uncontrolled disease, whereas the third patient is alive and disease-free after metastasectomy. No local recurrences were observed. These results are better than those observed in 215 contemporary cases of conventional osteosarcoma treated with the same protocols. This study confirms that TOS is not a uniformly lethal tumor as suggested by prior reports. By employing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, a high percentage of patients with TOS can be cured, and in most of them, a limb-sparing surgery is possible and safe.

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