JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Blood pressure associated with sleep-disordered breathing in a population sample of children.

Hypertension 2008 November
The current criteria for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children are not based on a clinically relevant outcome. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of blood pressure with SDB in a random sample of the local elementary school children (kindergarten through grade 5) using a 2-phased strategy. During phase 1, a brief questionnaire was completed for all of the children (N=5740) with a response rate of 78.5%. During phase 2, 700 randomly selected children from phase 1 with a response rate of 70.0% were assessed with a full polysomnograph and a history/physical, including an ECG; ear, nose, and throat; and pulmonary evaluation. We observed a significantly elevated systolic blood pressure associated with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI): AHI >or=1 (2.9 mm Hg); AHI >or=3 (7.1 mm Hg); and AHI >or=5 (12.9 mm Hg). The SDB and blood pressure association remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index percentile or waist circumference, sleep efficiency, percentage of rapid eye movement sleep, and snoring. In addition, older age, body mass index percentile, waist circumference, and snoring were significantly associated with blood pressure, independent of SDB. Based on these findings, our study suggests that SDB is significantly associated with higher levels of systolic blood pressure in children aged 5 to 12 years even after adjusting for the various confounding factors. Clinically, the data support the threshold of AHI >or=5 for the initiation of treatment for SDB. Additional research is indicated to assess the efficacy of SDB treatment on reducing blood pressure.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app