JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Atopic dermatitis in premature and term children.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) in premature compared with term children, the frequency of food allergy in children with AD, and the possible differences in prevalence of AD in children delivered by caesarean section compared with vaginally delivered children.

DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study over 2 years.

METHOD: 609 children (193 premature and 416 term) were included. At 2 years, 512 children (161 premature and 351 term) participated. Children with symptoms consistent with AD/possible food allergy were examined, and the dermatitis was evaluated according to the SCORAD index. Skin prick test, specific IgE, elimination/challenge and DBPC challenge were performed.

RESULTS: 18.6% (95/512) of the children (19.9% (32/161) premature and 17.9% (63/351) term) had a diagnosis of AD. The prevalence of adverse reactions to food in all the children with AD was 15.8% (15/95) (similar in preterm and term children). AD was found in 17.5% (30/171) of children delivered by caesarean section, and 19.1% (65/341) delivered vaginally

CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of AD in the first 2 years of life was 18.6%, with no significant difference between preterm and term children. Adverse reactions to food were found in 15.8% (a similar prevalence in premature and term children). Mode of delivery did not affect prevalence of AD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app