Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Hashimoto's thyroiditis in Down's syndrome: clinical presentation and evolution.

AIM: It was the aim of this study to describe the presentation and clinical course of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in children with Down's syndrome (DS) in 2 Scottish health regions.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analysed clinical, biochemical and thyroid antibody status in 38 patients with DS with HT diagnosed from 1989 to 2004.

RESULTS: The sex distribution was similar (20 males, 18 females), with a median age of 12.3 years (range 2.1-17.7). Of the 38 patients reviewed, 29 were identified by screening. A goitre was present in 6/38 patients. Thyroid antibodies were positive in 36/38 patients, negative in 1/38, and data were unavailable for 1/38. At presentation, 37/38 patients were hypothyroid: 21/37 with compensated hypothyroidism (6 treated initially) and 16/37 with decompensated hypothyroidism (all treated). Of the 15/21 compensated patients who were untreated initially, only 3 remitted while 12 showed disease progression prompting treatment. In the decompensated group, 1/16 patient pursued a fluctuating course between hypo- and hyperthyroidism. The final patient, who was hyperthyroid at presentation, also showed marked fluctuation in thyroid function over a 5-year period.

CONCLUSION: The natural history of HT in DS is unusual, with no female predominance and infrequent goitre in our cohort. While almost all patients required treatment eventually, clinicians should be aware that the disease may pursue a fluctuating course between hypo- and hyperthyroidism.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app