OPEN IN READ APP
JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY

The prognostic value of the heart rate response during exercise and recovery in patients with heart failure: influence of beta-blockade

Ross Arena, Jonathan Myers, Joshua Abella, Mary Ann Peberdy, Daniel Bensimhon, Paul Chase, Marco Guazzi
International Journal of Cardiology 2010 January 21, 138 (2): 166-73
18804882

BACKGROUND: The heart rate increase during exercise (DeltaHR) and heart rate recovery (HRR) have demonstrated prognostic value in several investigations, but its application in the heart failure (HF) population is limited, particularly in a beta-blocked (BB) cohort.

METHODS: Five-hundred and twenty subjects with HF underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing to determine peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)), the minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO(2)) slope, DeltaHR and HRR at 1 min (HRR(1)).

RESULTS: There were 79 cardiac-related deaths during the tracking period. A HRR(1) threshold of </>or=16 beats/min was a significant prognostic marker in the overall group (hazard ratio: 4.6, 95% CI: 2.8-7.5, p<0.001) as well as no-BB (hazard ratio: 9.1, 95% CI: 4.1-20.2, p<0.001) and BB (hazard ratio: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.6-5.4, p<0.001) subgroups. The DeltaHR was a significant univariate predictor in the overall group and no-BB subgroup only. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed HRR(1) was the strongest prognostic marker (chi-square: 39.9, p<0.001). The VE/VCO(2) slope (residual chi-square: 21.8, p<0.001) and LVEF (residual chi-square: 9.6, p=0.002) were also retained in the regression.

CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that HRR maintains prognostic value in HF irrespective of BB use. The routine inclusion of HRR in the prognostic assessment of patients with HF may be warranted.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
18804882
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"