JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A review of the literature on gender and age differences in the prevalence and characteristics of constipation in North America.

Constipation is a common problem and affects between 2% and 28% of the general population. It is thought to affect more women than men. The severity of constipation is variable and it can be an acute or chronic condition. Often, it requires frequent interventions that may produce mixed or even unsatisfactory results. Knowledge of potentially gender- and age-related differences in constipation would be useful to clinicians to help them identify high-risk patients. In addition, researchers might use this information to design both descriptive and intervention studies. This article reviews the evidence from the studies on gender and age differences in prevalence of constipation, gender differences in the prevalence and characteristics of constipation, and age differences in the prevalence and characteristics of constipation. The available literature suggests that the prevalence of constipation is consistently higher in women than in men. However, evidence of gender differences in the characteristics of constipation is inconsistent. Prevalence rates appear to increase gradually after the age of 50 years, with the largest increase after the age of 70 years. The literature is both sparse and inconsistent in its description of age differences in the characteristics of constipation. This lack of research is a significant issue given the magnitude of this problem in the older adult population. Research is needed on gender and age differences in the symptoms of constipation, and how covariates impact the prevalence and severity of constipation in the elderly.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app