COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
META-ANALYSIS
REVIEW
SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Early laparoscopy versus active observation in acute abdominal pain: systematic review and meta-analysis.

INTRODUCTION: Patients with acute abdominal pain account for half of acute general surgical admissions. About one-third have no clear diagnosis at the time of presentation. Traditionally, such patients were managed by active observation and repeated clinical assessment over a period of time. More recently, the use of early laparoscopy has been advocated.

METHODS: The Medline and PubMed databases, trial registries and conference proceedings were searched to identify randomised controlled trials comparing early laparoscopy to active observation in patients with undifferentiated acute abdominal pain.

RESULTS: The systematic review identified four eligible trials (811 patients). Early laparoscopy reduced the number of patients discharged without a final diagnosis (pooled odds ratio: 0.13; 95% CI: 0.03-0.51; p=0.003). There were no statistically significant effects on complications, readmission rates or hospital stay. There was evidence of significant heterogeneity between the trials.

CONCLUSION: There is insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of early laparoscopy as the gold standard in patients with undifferentiated acute abdominal pain. Conversely, there is no evidence of harm. Further large clinical trials are required to determine the role of laparoscopy in this clinical situation.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app