COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Chondrogenesis from immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells: comparison between collagen gel and pellet culture methods

Chih-Hung Chang, Hsin-Yi Lin, Hsu-Wei Fang, Siow-Tung Loo, Shih-Chieh Hung, Yi-Ching Ho, Chia-Chun Chen, Feng-Huei Lin, Hwa-Chang Liu
Artificial Organs 2008, 32 (7): 561-6
18638311
Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can differentiate into cells of connective tissue lineages, including cartilage. To overcome the limiting autogenous chondrocyte populations available in cartilage repair, various methods have been developed to maximize chondrogenesis of hMSCs in vitro, most of which use cells derived from primary culture. In this study, we compared chondrogenesis of immortalized hMSCs embedded in collagen gel to those grown in pellet culture. The hMSCs in collagen scaffolds expressed more glycosaminoglycan than those in pellet culture. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that the expression of genes encoding sox-9, aggrecan, and types I and II collagen increased in pellet culture over time. However, in the collagen cultures, only type II collagen and aggrecan expression increased over time, whereas sox-9 expression remained unchanged and type I collagen expression decreased. These results indicate that the immortalized hMSC line is a promising tool for further in vitro chondrogenic studies.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
18638311
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"