OPEN IN READ APP
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in 49,XXXXY syndrome

Trevor L Hoffman, Arastoo Vossough, Can Ficicioglu, Jeannie Visootsak
Pediatric Neurology 2008, 38 (6): 450-3
18486832
Klinefelter syndrome is a chromosomal disorder characterized by one or more supernumerary X chromosomes, in addition to the normal 46,XY male karyotype. Whereas classic Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) occurs in 1:400 births, the most severe Klinefelter variant (49,XXXXY) occurs in only 1:85,000 births. The degree of cognitive impairment, specific skeletal changes, and genital abnormalities in Klinefelter syndrome variants is thought to correlate with the number of additional X-chromosomes present. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in individuals with classic Klinefelter syndrome show smaller brain volumes, but magnetic resonance imaging data are lacking for individuals with rarer and more severe Klinefelter variants. We present case reports and magnetic resonance imaging studies on 3 individuals with 49,XXXXY. All 3 patients exhibited varying degrees of volume loss and abnormalities in white matter. Changes in white matter may represent a specific finding in patients with severe Klinefelter variants such as 49,XXXXY, and karyotype analysis should be considered in patients with unexplained white-matter disease, especially when developmental delay or genital abnormalities are present.

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
18486832
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"