Comparative Study
Journal Article
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Intestinal mucosa-associated microflora in ulcerative colitis patients before and after restorative proctocolectomy with an ileoanal pouch.

PURPOSE: This study was designed to identify the mucosa-associated microflora in patients with severe ulcerative colitis before and after restorative proctocolectomy with ileoanal pouch construction in comparison with historic controls.

METHODS: Ten patients with a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis were evaluated. Mucus was collected during colonoscopy from all segments of the colon and terminal ileum before surgery, and from the ileal pouch two and eight months after ileostomy closure. The prevalence and mean concentration of the mucosa-associated microflora were compared over time and with historic controls.

RESULTS: Veillonella sp was the most prevalent bacterium in patients and controls. Klebsiella sp was significantly more prevalent in the ileum of controls, was not found in patients with ulcerative colitis, and after proctocolectomy returned to values found in controls. Some bacteria such as Enterobacter sp, Staphylococcus sp (coag-), Bacteroides sp (npg), Lactobacillus sp, and Veillonella sp had higher mean concentrations in the ileal pouch of patients after surgery than in controls.

CONCLUSION: No bacterium was identified that could be exclusively responsible for the maintenance of the inflammatory process. The mucosa-associated microflora of patients with ulcerative colitis underwent significant changes after proctocolectomy with ileal pouch construction and returned to almost normal values for some bacteria.

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